Military Service

Charlie promoted to Lieutenant Colonel by Major General Weber, Commanding General, 1st Marine Division and Colonel Favors (Division Operations Officer, G-3) in Okinawa, Japan, July 22, 2002. At the time of the promotion, Charlie was assigned as the Current Operations Officer, G-3, 3rd Marine Division, and was responsible for force deployment monitoring and daily operations of the Division's forces from the Western Pacific rim and the Alaskan north, as far south as the Philippines and Australia, and to the west as far as India and Pakistan.
Charlie promoted to Lieutenant Colonel by Major General Weber, Commanding General, 1st Marine Division and Colonel Favors (Division Operations Officer, G-3) in Okinawa, Japan, July 22, 2002.

At the time of the promotion, Charlie was assigned as the Current Operations Officer, G-3, 3rd Marine Division, and was responsible for force deployment monitoring and daily operations of the Division’s forces from the Western Pacific rim and the Alaskan north, as far south as the Philippines and Australia, and to the west as far as India and Pakistan.

Charlie commended by Major General Mochida, Japanese Self Defense Force, for work improving anti-terrorist operations in Japan and support of the training of the Japanese military forces being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

Charlie commended by Major General Mochida, Japanese Self Defense Force, for work improving anti-terrorist operations in Japan and support of the training of the Japanese military forces being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Charlie is recognized by the Japanese Self Defense Force (Japanese Army) for his service in organizing anti-terrorist operations in Japan and for helping to ready the Japanese Self Defense Force for operations in Iraq. This was the Japan’s first deployment of military forces outside side of Japan since WWII and instrumental to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

Charlie is recognized by the Japanese Self Defense Force (Japanese Army) for his service in organizing anti-terrorist operations in Japan and for helping to ready the Japanese Self Defense Force for operations in Iraq.

This was the Japan’s first deployment of military forces outside side of Japan since WWII and instrumental to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

Charlie decorated with the Joint Services Commendation Medal by Col Drylie for Service supporting the Bosnia Peace Enforcement Operation in 1997. Charlie decorated with the Joint Service Commendation Medal by Col Drylie for Service supporting the Bosnia Peace Enforcement Operation in 1997.

 

Desert Storm 1991. Captain Charlie Schaupp with captured enemy weapons. Charlie holds a captured Iraqi AK-47 in front of a large RPG (Rocket Propelled Grenade) launcher. The photo was taken at the "Ice Tray" north of the Al Wafra oil fields at the completion of major ground offensives. Charlie stayed in Kuwait for several months after the ground offensive to provide logistic support for the 8th Marines Regimental Combat Team. Desert Storm 1991. Captain Charlie Schaupp with captured enemy weapons.

Charlie holds a captured Iraqi AK-47 in front of a large RPG (Rocket Propelled Grenade) launcher.

The photo was taken at the “Ice Tray” north of the Al Wafra oil fields at the completion of major ground offensives.

Charlie stayed in Kuwait for several months after the ground offensive to provide logistic support for the 8th Marines Regimental Combat Team.

Operation Desert Storm 1991. Charlie enjoys an MRE (Meal Ready to Eat) lunch with the Marines of Company B near El Kan-jar during Operation Desert Storm. About two weeks after this photo taken the 100 hour ground war commenced. Operation Desert Storm 1991. Charlie enjoys an MRE (Meal Ready to Eat) lunch with the Marines of Company B near El Kan-jar during Operation Desert Storm.

About two weeks after this photo taken the 100 hour ground war commenced.

(Desert Storm, 1991) Charlie, far left, stands with his Marines and liberated citizens of Kuwait holding a Kuwait flag on "Hell Highway". The Iraqi Army tried to flee Kuwait City with their tanks & weapons and anything they could steal from the Kuwaitis. This highway led north from Kuwait City back to Iraq and in the destroyed vehicles (in the background) there were TV sets, silverware, electronics, clothes--anything the fleeing Iraqis thought was valuable they tried to take with them. A U.S. air-strike stopped the Iraqis from retreating with the weapons and stolen loot, hence the name "Hell Highway." (Desert Storm, 1991) Charlie, far left, stands with his Marines and liberated citizens of Kuwait holding a Kuwait flag on “Hell Highway”.

The Iraqi Army tried to flee Kuwait City with their tanks & weapons and anything they could steal from the Kuwaitis. This highway led north from Kuwait City back to Iraq and in the destroyed vehicles (in the background) there were TV sets, silverware, electronics, clothes–anything the fleeing Iraqis thought was valuable they tried to take with them. A U.S. air-strike stopped the Iraqis from retreating with the weapons and stolen loot, hence the name “Hell Highway.”

1700 H-13 Assembly Area Red, Desert Storm 1991 (at 5PM the day before the ground assault). Charlie sits on the barrel of the M-60 tank sent to defend his detachment and the 50,000 gallons of fuel they moved forward to top off the assault at 0600 the next morning. Charlie's detachment is about five miles forward of friendly lines, and you can see the smoke from the oil fires starting to approach from the north. By 1900 (7PM) Charlie's detachment of 17 Marines would be in complete darkness and stood at the ready all night to defend the fuel stockpile from enemy attack. To defend the valuable fuel, they had one M-60 tank, two 50 Caliber machine guns and their M-16 rifles. (Luckily Saddam's oil fires kept them completely obscured the entire night before the invasion the next morning). 1700 H-13 Assembly Area Red, Desert Storm 1991 (at 5PM the day before the ground assault). Charlie sits on the barrel of the M-60 tank sent to defend his detachment and the 50,000 gallons of fuel they moved forward to top off the assault at 0600 the next morning.

Charlie’s detachment is about five miles forward of friendly lines, and you can see the smoke from the oil fires starting to approach from the north. By 1900 (7PM) Charlie’s detachment of 17 Marines would be in complete darkness and stood at the ready all night to defend the fuel stockpile from enemy attack.

To defend the valuable fuel, they had one M-60 tank, two 50 Caliber machine guns and their M-16 rifles. (Luckily Saddam’s oil fires kept them completely obscured the entire night before the invasion the next morning).

Desert Storm 1991. Surrender certificates that Charlie and his Marines received from surrendering Iraqi Army POW's. The certificates were dropped by U.S. airplanes on Iraqi units to give them directions on how to surrender once the ground invasion of Kuwait had started. Charlie was the Commander of a Landing Support Company supporting the 2nd Marine Division's advance to Kuwait City. One of his missions, along with resupplying fuel and ammo to the advancing forces, was to remove enemy prisoners from the combat area and transport them back to Military Police in the rear area for confinement.

 

 

Desert Storm 1991. Surrender certificates that Charlie and his Marines received from surrendering Iraqi Army POW’s.

The certificates were dropped by U.S. airplanes on Iraqi units to give them directions on how to surrender once the ground invasion of Kuwait had started.

Charlie was the Commander of a Landing Support Company supporting the 2nd Marine Division’s advance to Kuwait City.

One of his missions, along with resupplying fuel and ammo to the advancing forces, was to remove enemy prisoners from the combat area and transport them back to Military Police in the rear area for confinement.

Charlie's hometown newspaper reports on his mobilization for Bosnia peace enforcement operations in 1997. Charlie's assignment was to train senior staff members from the Army, Navy, Air force and Marines on NATO staff operations and support. (from Yolo Counties Newspaper The Daily Democrat)

 

 

Charlie’s hometown newspaper reports on his mobilization for Bosnia peace enforcement operations in 1997.

Charlie’s assignment was to train senior staff members from the Army, Navy, Air force and Marines on NATO staff operations and support. (from Yolo Counties Newspaper The Daily Democrat)

Charlie in the Battle of Fallujah in 2004. Blast crater and shrapnel-ed wall. Charlie was about 30 yards away from the blast when a 122MM rocket impacted (luckily Charlie was on the other-side of the wall). Several days later a 122MM rock impacted even closer and, unfortunately, lives were lost when a rocket hit the command post about 50 meters on the other side of the wall.

 

 

Charlie in the Battle of Fallujah in 2004. Blast crater and shrapnel-ed wall.

Charlie was about 30 yards away from the blast when a 122MM rocket impacted (luckily Charlie was on the other-side of the wall).

Several days later a 122MM rock impacted even closer and, unfortunately, lives were lost when a rocket hit the command post about 50 meters on the other side of the wall.Charlie is on the USS Wasp headed to Norway as a key member of the Commanding Generals staff of II Marine Expeditionary Force Forward in 1995. (from the Yolo Counties Daily Democrat)

 

Charlie is on the USS Wasp headed to Norway as a key member of the Commanding Generals staff of II Marine Expeditionary Force Forward in 1995. (from the Yolo Counties Daily Democrat)